Seaweeds and their communities in polar regions


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Christian.Wiencke [ at ] awi.de

Abstract

Polar seaweeds typically begin to grow in late winter-spring, around the time of sea-ice break up. They can grow under very low light enabling distributions to depths of ≥40 m. Moreover, they are physiologically adapted to low temperatures. Intertidal species exhibit a remarkable stress tolerance against freezing, desiccation and salinity changes. Endemism is much greater in the Antarctic compared to the Arctic species. On rocky shores of the Antarctic Peninsula and of Spitsbergen >80% of the bottom can be covered by seaweeds with standing biomass levels ≥20 kg wet wt m-2. Species richness and biomass declines, however, towards higher latitudes. Seaweeds are the dominant organisms in coastal waters and thus play important roles in benthic food webs and are likely to be of particular importance to benthic detrital food chains. Chemical defenses against herbivores are common in Antarctic, but not in Arctic seaweeds. More research is needed especially to study the effects of global climate changes.



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Inbook
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Peer-reviewed
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Published
Eprint ID
30606
DOI 10.1007/978-3-642-28451-9_13

Cite as
Wiencke, C. and Amsler, C. D. (2011): Seaweeds and their communities in polar regions , In: Seaweed Biology - Novel Insights into Ecophysiology, Ecology and Utilization, Seaweed Biology - Novel Insights into Ecophysiology, Ecology and Utilization, Heidelberg, New York, Dordrecht, London, Springer-Verlag, 27 p., ISBN: 978-3-642-28450-2 . doi: 10.1007/978-3-642-28451-9_13


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