Total volcanic stratospheric aerosol optical depths and implications for global climate change


Contact
Christoph.Ritter [ at ] awi.de

Abstract

Understanding the cooling effect of recent volcanoes is of particular interest in the context of the post-2000 slowing of the rate of global warming. Satellite observations of aerosol optical depth above 15 km have demonstrated that small-magnitude volcanic eruptions substantially perturb incoming solar radiation. Here we use lidar, Aerosol Robotic Network, and balloon-borne observations to provide evidence that currently available satellite databases neglect substantial amounts of volcanic aerosol between the tropopause and 15 km at middle to high latitudes and therefore underestimate total radiative forcing resulting from the recent eruptions. Incorporating these estimates into a simple climate model, we determine the global volcanic aerosol forcing since 2000 to be −0.19 ± 0.09 Wm−2. This translates into an estimated global cooling of 0.05 to 0.12°C. We conclude that recent volcanic events are responsible for more post-2000 cooling than is implied by satellite databases that neglect volcanic aerosol effects below 15 km.



Item Type
Article
Authors
Divisions
Primary Division
Programs
Primary Topic
Research Networks
Peer revision
ISI/Scopus peer-reviewed
Publication Status
Published
Eprint ID
36899
DOI 10.1002/2014GL061541

Cite as
Ridley, D. , Solomon, S. , Barnes, J. , Burlakov, V. , Deshler, T. , Dolgii, S. , Herber, A. B. , Nagai, T. , Neely, R. , Nevzorov, A. , Ritter, C. , Sakai, T. , Santer, B. , Sato, M. , Schmidt, A. , Uchino, O. and Vernier, J. (2014): Total volcanic stratospheric aerosol optical depths and implications for global climate change , Geophysical Research Letters, 41 (22), pp. 7763-7769 . doi: 10.1002/2014GL061541


Download
[img]
Preview
PDF
Ridley_2014stratoAOD.pdf

Download (1MB) | Preview
Cite this document as:

Share


Citation

Research Platforms

Campaigns


Actions
Edit Item Edit Item