Structure and seasonal changes in atmospheric boundary layer on coast of the east Antarctic continent


Contact
Annette.Rinke [ at ] awi.de

Abstract

The temperature, humidity, and vertical distribution of ozone in the Antarctic atmospheric boundary layer(ABL) and their seasonal changes are analyzed, by using the high-resolution profile data obtained during the International Polar Year 2008 to 2009 at Zhongshan Station, to further the understanding of the structure and processes of the ABL. The results show that the frequency of the convective boundary layer in the warm season accounts for 84% of its annual occurrence frequency. The frequency of the stable boundary layer in the cold season accounts for 71% of its annual occurrence frequency. A neutral boundary layer appears rarely. The average altitude of the convective boundary layer determined by the parcel method is 600 m; this is 200 to 300 m higher than that over inland Antarctica. The average altitude of the top of the boundary layer determined by the potential temperature gradient and humidity gradient is 1 200 m in the warm season and 1 500 m in the cold season. The vertical structures of ozone and specific humidity in the ABL exhibit obvious seasonal changes. The specific humidity is very high with greater vertical gradient in the warm season and very low with a lesser gradient in the cold season under 2 000 m. The atmospheric ozone in the ABL is consumed by photochemical processes in the warm season, which results in a slight difference in altitude. The sub-highest ozone center is located in the boundary layer, indicating that the ozone transferred from the stratosphere to the troposphere reaches the low boundary layer during October and November in Antarctica.



Item Type
Article
Authors
Divisions
Primary Division
Programs
Primary Topic
Peer revision
Peer-reviewed
Publication Status
Published
Eprint ID
37089
DOI 10.3724/SP.J.1085.2013.00139

Cite as
Bian, L. , Zou, H. , Lin, Z. , Zhang, D. , Rinke, A. and Dethloff, K. (2013): Structure and seasonal changes in atmospheric boundary layer on coast of the east Antarctic continent , Advances in Polar Science, 24 (3), pp. 139-146 . doi: 10.3724/SP.J.1085.2013.00139


Download
[img]
Preview
PDF
bian2013.pdf

Download (2MB) | Preview
Cite this document as:

Share


Citation

Research Platforms
N/A

Campaigns


Actions
Edit Item Edit Item