Paralytic toxin profile of the marine dinoflagellate Gymnodinium catenatum Graham from the Mexican Pacific as revealed by LC-MS/MS


Contact
Bernd.Krock [ at ] awi.de

Abstract

The paralytic shellfish toxin (PST) profiles of Gymnodinium catenatum Graham have been reported for several strains from the Pacific coast of Mexico cultured under different laboratory conditions, as well as from natural populations. Up to 15 saxitoxin analogues occurred and the quantity of each toxin depended on the growth phase and culture conditions. Previous analysis of toxin profiles of G. catenatum isolated from Mexico have been based on post-column oxidation liquid chromatography with fluorescence detection (LC-FLD), a method prone to artefacts and non-specificity, leading to misinterpretation of toxin composition. We describe, for the first time, the complete toxin profile for several G. catenatum strains from diverse locations of the Pacific coast of Mexico. The new results confirmed previous reports on the dominance of the less potent sulfocarbamoyl toxins (C1/2); significant differences, however, in the composition (e.g., absence of saxitoxin, gonyautoxin 2/3 and neosaxitoxin) were revealed in our confirmatory analysis. The LC-MS/MS analyses also indicated at least seven putative benzoyl toxin analogues and provided support for their existence. This new toxin profile shows a high similarity (> 80%) to the profiles reported from several regions around the world, suggesting low genetic variability among global populations.



Item Type
Article
Authors
Divisions
Primary Division
Programs
Primary Topic
Peer revision
ISI/Scopus peer-reviewed
Publication Status
Published
Eprint ID
37851
DOI 10.1080/19440049.2014.1000978

Cite as
Bustillos-Guzmán, J. J. , Band-Schmidt, C. J. , Durán-Riveroll, L. M. , Hernández-Sandoval, F. E. , López-Cortés, D. J. , Núñez-Vásquez, E. J. , Cembella, A. and Krock, B. (2015): Paralytic toxin profile of the marine dinoflagellate Gymnodinium catenatum Graham from the Mexican Pacific as revealed by LC-MS/MS , Food Additives & Contaminants: Part A, 32 (3), pp. 381-394 . doi: 10.1080/19440049.2014.1000978


Share


Citation

Research Platforms
N/A

Campaigns


Actions
Edit Item Edit Item