Association of deep-sea incirrate octopods with manganese crusts and nodule fields in the Pacific Ocean


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autun.purser [ at ] awi.de

Abstract

Incirrate octopods (those without fins) are among the larger megafauna inhabiting the benthic environments of all oceans, commonly in water depths down to about 3,000 m. They are known to protect and brood their eggs until the juveniles hatch, but to date there is little published information on octopod deep-sea life cycles and distribution. For this study, three manganese-crust and nodule-abundant regions of the deep Pacific were examined by remote operated-vehicle and towed camera surveys carried out between 2011 and 2016.



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Eprint ID
43129
DOI 10.1016/j.cub.2016.10.052

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Purser, A. , Marcon, Y. , Hoving, H. J. T. , Vecchione, M. , Piatkowski, U. , Eason, D. , Bluhm, H. and Boetius, A. (2016): Association of deep-sea incirrate octopods with manganese crusts and nodule fields in the Pacific Ocean , Current Biology, 26 (24), R1268-R1269 . doi: 10.1016/j.cub.2016.10.052


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