Predation impact of the notothenoid fish Trematomus bernacchii on the size structure of the scallop Adamussium colbecki in Terra Nova Bay (Ross Sea, Antarctica)


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Thomas.Brey [ at ] awi.de

Abstract

Biotic interactions are particularly relevant in stable environments, such as the High Antarctic areas. Among them, predation has a key role in structuring community and population variables, including size-frequency distribution. This study aims to quantify the impact of predation by the notothenioid fish Trematomus bernacchii on the Antarctic scallop Adamussium colbecki- size distribution. We developed a model of this impact that estimates the size distribution of the preyed scallop population, taking into account for the predator- size distribution, sex structure, and daily consumption. Comparing this size distribution of the preyed A. colbecki with the living populations at Terra Nova Bay (Ross Sea, Antarctica), we were able to detect a relevant impact of fish predation. Fish-size frequency resulted to be the major factor shaping preysize structure, with significant differences between predation by males and females. Our findings, given the key role of the two species in the littoral ecosystem of Terra Nova Bay (Antarctic Special Protected Area 161), fall into the framework of ecosystem management of High Antarctic coastal areas, particularly in the actual context of climate change, and increasing anthropogenic impact



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ISI/Scopus peer-reviewed
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Published
Eprint ID
44192
DOI 10.1007/s00300-017-2077-4

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Dell'Acqua, O. , Brey, T. , Chiantore, M. and Vacchi, M. (2017): Predation impact of the notothenoid fish Trematomus bernacchii on the size structure of the scallop Adamussium colbecki in Terra Nova Bay (Ross Sea, Antarctica) , Polar Biology . doi: 10.1007/s00300-017-2077-4


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