DISTRIBUTION AND FATE OF METHANE RELEASED FROM SUBMARINE SOURCES – CHALLENGES AND RESULTS OF MEASUREMENTS BY USING AN IMPROVED IN SITU MASS SPECTROMETER.


Contact
Torben.Gentz [ at ] awi.de

Abstract

Methane (CH4) is the most frequent organic compound in the atmosphere and its influence on the global climate is subject of currently conducted scientific discussion. One source of atmospheric methane is the release of CH4 from the oceans seafloor. These submarine sources are characterized by rising gas bubbles or diffusive methane flux into the water column. Due to the limited number of samples taken by conventional ex situ methods, an accurate quantification of the methane distribution could hardly be estimated. With the help of an optimized mass spectrometer (9 years of ongoing engineering) it became possible to obtain distribution patterns of dissolved CH4 in the water column in high resolution. In this talk I will present the challenges of the work with the Inspectr200-200 during the last 9 years and, from the scientific point of view, the detection and mapping of submarine released methane as well as the study of relevant pathways and its potential contribution to the atmospheric methane budget.



Item Type
Conference (Invited talk)
Authors
Divisions
Primary Division
Programs
Primary Topic
Peer revision
Not peer-reviewed
Publication Status
Published
Event Details
Seminar presentation at the mass spectrometry centre Rostock, Research Building Department „Life, Light & Matter“ of the Interdisciplinary Faculty of the University of Rostock..
Eprint ID
44520
Cite as
Gentz, T. (2017): DISTRIBUTION AND FATE OF METHANE RELEASED FROM SUBMARINE SOURCES – CHALLENGES AND RESULTS OF MEASUREMENTS BY USING AN IMPROVED IN SITU MASS SPECTROMETER. , Seminar presentation at the mass spectrometry centre Rostock, Research Building Department „Life, Light & Matter“ of the Interdisciplinary Faculty of the University of Rostock. .


Download
[img]
Preview
PDF
Vortragsankuendigung.pdf

Download (178kB) | Preview
Cite this document as:

Share

Research Platforms

Campaigns


Actions
Edit Item Edit Item