Origin and transformation of organic carbon from the Hiawatha meteorite crater, North-West Greenland: a preliminary study


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Olaf.Eisen [ at ] awi.de

Abstract

Glaciofluvial sand draining the newly discovered Hiawatha impact crater under the Greenland Ice Sheet in North-West Greenland contains shocked quartz, glasses derived from direct mineral melts, carbon-bearing glasses, particles of charcoal and transformed ('glassy') charcoal, as well as low-reflectance carbonaceous grains with tiny carbon spherules and mineral fragments. Some of these grains are interpreted as ejecta and perhaps plume material containing sublimated and re-deposited carbon. The only plausible carbon source of this carbon is subfossil Arctic vegetation including small conifer and angiosperm trees older than 50 ka and likely around 2.3 Ma in age, supporting a very young age of the crater.



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Peer-reviewed
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Published
Eprint ID
47677
DOI 10.1016/j.egypro.2018.07.025

Cite as
Garde, A. A. , Eisen, O. , Fahnestock, M. A. , Funder, S. , Guvad, C. , Haack, H. , Kjær, K. H. , Larsen, N. K. , MacGregor, J. A. , McDonald, I. , Møller, J. D. , Søndergaard, A. S. , Waight, T. E. and Weikusat, C. (2018): Origin and transformation of organic carbon from the Hiawatha meteorite crater, North-West Greenland: a preliminary study , Energy Procedia, 146 , pp. 17-22 . doi: 10.1016/j.egypro.2018.07.025


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