First in-situ seismic record of spreading events at the ultraslow spreading Southwest Indian Ridge


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Vera.Schlindwein [ at ] awi.de

Abstract

In situ observations of mid-ocean ridge spreading events are rare, and no observations exist at ultraslow spreading ridges. In 2013, two earthquake swarms and prominent, tidally modulated harmonic tremor were accidentally recorded by ocean bottom seismometers at the Southwest Indian Ridge. After relative relocation, the first swarm shows downward migrating hypocenters, while the second swarm immediately spreads over a steeply dipping plane originating at the same location as the first swarm. The tremor signal is temporally connected to the swarms and persists for more than 20 days after the second swarm. Polarization analysis points to two source locations above the seismically active area at 2- to 8-km depth. We interpret swarms and tremor as evidence for a dike intrusion event that caused disruption to an existent hydrothermal system. The tremor may be generated by enhanced hydrothermal circulation caused by the added heat of the intrusion with increased flow during low tides.



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Article
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Primary Division
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ISI/Scopus peer-reviewed
Publication Status
Published
Eprint ID
48207
DOI 10.1029/2018GL079928

Cite as
Meier, M. and Schlindwein, V. (2018): First in-situ seismic record of spreading events at the ultraslow spreading Southwest Indian Ridge , Geophysical Research Letters, 45 (19), pp. 10360-10368 . doi: 10.1029/2018GL079928


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