Ice‐binding proteins and the ‘domain of unknown function’ 3494 family


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Maddalena.Bayer [ at ] awi.de

Abstract

Ice‐binding proteins (IBPs) control the growth and shape of ice crystals to cope with subzero temperatures in psychrophilic and freeze‐tolerant organisms. Recently, numerous proteins containing the domain of unknown function (DUF) 3494 were found to bind ice crystals and, hence, are classified as IBPs. DUF3494 IBPs constitute today the most widespread of the known IBP families. They can be found in different organisms including bacteria, yeasts and microalgae, supporting the hypothesis of horizontal transfer of its gene. Although the 3D structure is always a discontinuous β‐solenoid with a triangular cross‐section and an adjacent alpha‐helix, DUF3494 IBPs present very diverse activities in terms of the magnitude of their thermal hysteresis and inhibition of ice recrystallization. The proteins are secreted into the environments around the host cells or are anchored on their cell membranes. This review covers several aspects of this new class of IBPs, which promise to leave their mark on several research fields including structural biology, protein biochemistry and cryobiology.



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ISI/Scopus peer-reviewed
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Published
Eprint ID
49204
DOI 10.1111/febs.14764

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Vance, T. D. R. , Bayer-Giraldi, M. , Davies, P. L. and Mangiagalli, M. (2019): Ice‐binding proteins and the ‘domain of unknown function’ 3494 family , The FEBS Journal, 286 (5), pp. 855-873 . doi: 10.1111/febs.14764


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