Late Holocene ice-wedge polygon dynamics in northeastern Siberian coastal lowlands


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Lutz.Schirrmeister [ at ] awi.de

Abstract

Ice-wedge polygons are common features of northeastern Siberian lowland periglacial tundra landscapes. To deduce the formation and alternation of ice-wedge polygons in the Kolyma Delta and in the Indigirka Lowland, we studied shallow cores, up to 1.3 m deep, from polygon center and rim locations. The formation of well-developed low-center polygons with elevated rims and wet centers is shown by the beginning of peat accumulation, increased organic matter contents and changes in vegetation cover from Poaceae-, Alnus-, and Betula-dominated pollen spectra to dominating Cyperaceae and Botryoccocus presence, and Carex and Drepanocladus revolvens macro-fossils. Tecamoebae data support such a change from wetland to open-water conditions in polygon centers by changes from dominating eurybiontic and sphagnobiontic to hydrobiontic species assemblages. The peat accumulation indicates low-center polygon formation and started between 2380 ± 30 and 1676 ± 32 years before present (BP) in the Kolyma Delta. We recorded an opposite change from open-water to wetland conditions due to rim degradation and consecutive high-center polygon formation in the Indigirka Lowland between 2144 ± 33 and 1632 ± 32 yrs BP. The late Holocene records of polygon landscape development reveal changes in local hydrology and soil moisture.



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Scopus/ISI peer-reviewed
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Published
Eprint ID
50343
DOI 10.1080/15230430.2018.1462595

Cite as
Schirrmeister, L. , Bobrov, A. , Raschke, E. , Herzschuh, U. , Strauss, J. , Pestryakova, L. A. and Wetterich, S. (2018): Late Holocene ice-wedge polygon dynamics in northeastern Siberian coastal lowlands , Arctic, Antarctic, and Alpine Research, 50 (1), e1462595 . doi: 10.1080/15230430.2018.1462595


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