Copper and cadmium administration induce toxicity and oxidative stress in the marine flatworm Macrostomum lignano


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Ulf.Bickmeyer [ at ] awi.de

Abstract

The contamination of coastal regions with different toxicants, including heavy metal ions such as copper and cadmium jeopardize health and survival of organisms exposed to this habitat. To study the effects of high copper and cadmium concentrations in these marine environments, we used the flatworm Macrostomum lignano as a model. This platyhelminth lives in shallow coastal water and is exposed to high concentrations of all toxicants that accumulate in these sea floors. We could show that both, cadmium and copper show toxicity at higher concentrations, with copper being more toxic than cadmium. At concentrations below acute toxicity, a reduced long-term survival was observed for both metal ions. The effects of sublethal doses comprise reduced physical activities, an increase in ROS levels within the worms, and alterations of the mitochondrial biology. Moreover, cell death events were substantially increased in response to sublethal concentrations of both metal ions and stem cell activity was reduced following exposure to higher cadmium concentrations. Finally, the expression of several genes involved in xenobiotic metabolism was substantially altered by this intervention. Taken together, M. lignano has been identified as a suitable model for marine toxicological studies as it allows to quantify several relevant life-history traits as well as of physiological and behavioral read-outs.



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ISI/Scopus peer-reviewed
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Published
Eprint ID
51488
DOI 10.1016/j.aquatox.2020.105428

Cite as
Ma, Y. , Rivera-Ingraham, G. , Nommick, A. , Bickmeyer, U. and Roeder, T. (2020): Copper and cadmium administration induce toxicity and oxidative stress in the marine flatworm Macrostomum lignano , Aquatic Toxicology, 221 , p. 105428 . doi: 10.1016/j.aquatox.2020.105428


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