Contaminated by war: a brief history of sea-dumping of munitions


Contact
Matthias.Brenner [ at ] awi.de

Abstract

Munitions introduced to the sea during military activities, including naval combat and mine warfare represent only a fraction of military material present in seas and oceans. Huge amounts of obsolete conventional munitions and chemical munitions were dumped to the sea until 1975, when London convention put a stop of sea dumping. Such munitions are a threat for maritime workers, but also for environment. Corroding shells release toxic degradation products to sediments and bottom water, and unlike other contaminants, they cannot be reduced by land measures. Only removal of source can reduce the contamination. Much work has been done in the last decade, and mechanisms of toxicity and bioaccumulation are being recognized, as well as transport and spreading mechanisms. The full assessment of the risk associated with munitions now depends on broad application of developed techniques.



Item Type
Article
Authors
Divisions
Primary Division
Programs
Primary Topic
Peer revision
ISI/Scopus peer-reviewed
Publication Status
Published
Eprint ID
53316
DOI 10.1016/j.marenvres.2020.105189

Cite as
Beldowski, J. , Brenner, M. and Lehtonen, K. K. (2020): Contaminated by war: a brief history of sea-dumping of munitions , Marine Environmental Research, 162 (105189) . doi: 10.1016/j.marenvres.2020.105189


Share


Citation

Research Platforms
N/A

Campaigns

Funded by
EU Baltic Sea Intereg Project DAIMON


Actions
Edit Item Edit Item