Sand grains in the stomach of brown shrimp, Crangon crangon: Crunchy garnish, supportive macerator, or simply dirt?


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Lars.Gutow [ at ] awi.de

Abstract

Brown shrimp, Crangon crangon, inhabit highly productive sandy and muddy grounds of the southern North Sea. The stomachs of the shrimp contain variable and often high numbers of sediment grains. The function of sediment grains inside the stomach and the purpose of their ingestion are only poorly understood. We tested in laboratory experiments whether sediment and associated organic material complement the natural food of C. crangon or if sand grains may be used by the shrimp to support trituration and maceration of ingested food. The shrimp showed no notable preference for sediment with natural organic content over sediment with reduced organic content, limited ingestion of sediment upon starvation, and no additional uptake of sand grains after feeding. Instead, C. crangon took up sediment only while feeding on regular food, suggesting that sand grains are not ingested intentionally but rather incidentally as a side effect of hasty gobbling. This conclusion is supported by the highly variable uptake of sand grains among individuals. Under experimental conditions, sand grains from sediments do not seem to have a crucial function in food processing and digestion in brown shrimp.



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ISI/Scopus peer-reviewed
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Published
Eprint ID
53741
DOI 10.1016/j.seares.2021.102020

Cite as
Schmidt, N. , Korez, S. , Saborowski, R. and Gutow, L. (2021): Sand grains in the stomach of brown shrimp, Crangon crangon: Crunchy garnish, supportive macerator, or simply dirt? , Journal of Sea Research, 170 , p. 102020 . doi: 10.1016/j.seares.2021.102020


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