High Levels of CO 2 Exchange During Synoptic‐Scale Events Introduce Large Uncertainty Into the Arctic Carbon Budget


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katharina.jentzsch [ at ] awi.de

Abstract

CO2 release from thawing permafrost is both a consequence of, and a driver for, global warming, making accurate information on the Arctic carbon cycle essential for climate predictions. Eddy covariance data obtained from Bayelva (Svalbard) in 2015, using well‐established processing and quality control techniques, indicate that most of the annual net CO2 uptake is due to high CO2 flux events in winter that are associated with strong winds and probably relate to technical limitations of the gas analyzer. Emission events may relate to either (unidentified) instrumental limitations or to physical processes such as CO2 advection. Excluding the high winter uptake events yields an annual CO2 budget close to zero; whether or not these events are included can, therefore, have a considerable effect on carbon budget calculations. Further investigation will be crucial to pinpoint the factors causing these high CO2 flux events and to derive scientifically substantiated flux processing standards.



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Article
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Helmholtz Cross Cutting Activity (2021-2027)
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ISI/Scopus peer-reviewed
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Published
Eprint ID
54094
DOI 10.1029/2020GL092256

Cite as
Jentzsch, K. , Schulz, A. , Pirk, N. , Foken, T. , Crewell, S. and Boike, J. (2021): High Levels of CO 2 Exchange During Synoptic‐Scale Events Introduce Large Uncertainty Into the Arctic Carbon Budget , Geophysical Research Letters, 48 (9) . doi: 10.1029/2020GL092256


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