Spatial distribution of a flying seabird (Antarctic petrel) and penguins (Ad\'elie penguin, Emperor penguin) in the wider Weddell Sea (Antarctica) with links to ArcGIS map package


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hendrik.pehlke [ at ] awi.de

Abstract

Here we provide four ArcGIS map packages with georeferenced files on the spatial distribution of Antarctic petrels, Ad\'elie penguins (breeders and non-breeders) and Emperor penguins in the wider Weddell Sea (Antarctica), which were created in the context of the development of a marine protected area in the Weddell Sea. Antarctic petrel (Thalassoica antarctica): We approximated potential foraging habitats of T. antarctica according to existing literature by ice coverage from AMSR-E sea ice maps, bathymetric data from the International Bathymetric Chart of the Southern Ocean (IBCSO), and seawater temperature data from the Finite Element Sea Ice - Ocean Model (FESOM) provided by R. Timmermann (AWI). Subsequently, we combined our Antarctic petrel model with the kernel utilization distribution model from Descamps et al. (2016). The authors kindly provided us with shape files showing the kernel utilization summer and winter distribution of Antarctic petrel breeding at Svarthamaren. Breeding locations and estimated number of breeding pairs were taken from van Franeker et al. (1999). Favourable habitat conditions for Antarctic petrels were predicted for the Lazarev Sea and along the eastern coast of the Weddell Sea, particularly for the area off the Fimbul Ice Shelf and along the coast between approx. 15°E to 10°W within a water depth range from approx. 500 m to 2500 m. Breeding Ad\'elie penguins (Pygoscelis adeliae): The map of potential foraging habitats of breeding P. adeliae is based on British Antarctic Survey (BAS) Inventory data from Phil Trathan (ID 754) and Mike Dunn and P. Trathan (ID 764, 773, 779), a dataset from BAS (P. Trathan) and Instituto Ant\'artico Argentino (Mercedes Santos) (ID 753) and a dataset from the US AMLR Program from Jefferson Hinke and Wayne Trivelpiece (NOAA) (ID 910), which are stored in the Birdlife International\textquotesingles Seabird Tracking Database (data request: 20-10-2015). Suitable foraging habitats for breeding Ad\'elies from colonies from which no tracking data were not available were approximated by a 50 km buffer and a 50-100 km ring buffer around each colony according to the recommendations of a CCAMLR MPA planning workshop. Breeding locations and estimated abundance of breeding pairs were taken from Lynch and LaRue (2014). The tracking data were processed with a state-space model described by Johnson et al. (2008) and were implemented in the R package crawl (Johnson 2011). Jefferson Hinke (NOAA) kindly provided us with support running the R script. Highly suitable foraging habitats occurred about 50 km away from the colonies on King Georg Island, the colony in Hope Bay (Graham Land) and the colonies on the South Orkney Islands. Non-breeding Ad\'elie penguins (Pygoscelis adeliae): The map of potential foraging habitats of non-breeding P. adeliae is based on British Antarctic Survey (BAS) Inventory data from Phil Trathan (ID 754) and Mike Dunn and P. Trathan (ID 773, 779), a dataset from BAS (P. Trathan) and Instituto Ant\'artico Argentino (Mercedes Santos) (ID 753) and a dataset from the US AMLR Program from Jefferson Hinke and Wayne Trivelpiece (NOAA) (ID 910), which are stored in the Birdlife International\textquotesingles Seabird Tracking Database (data request: 20-10-2015). The tracking data were processed with a state-space model described by Johnson et al. (2008) and were implemented in the R package crawl (Johnson 2011). Jefferson Hinke (NOAA) kindly provided us with support running the R script. Highest habitat utilisation was concentrated in relative small areas (e.g., close to King Georg Island). However, the non-breeding Ad\'elies seemed to roam through large parts of the Weddell Sea. Emperor penguins (Aptenodytes forsteri): The probability map of A. forsteri occurrence was developed as a function of distance to colony and colony size from Fretwell et al. (2012, 2014) as well as from sea ice concentration from AMSR-E sea ice maps. Our model of emperor penguin foraging distribution during breeding season showed that the probability of occurrence is highest at the Halley and Dawson colony near Brunt Ice Shelf and at the Atka colony near Ekstrøm Ice Shelf. More information on the spatial analysis is given in working paper WG-EMM-16/03 and WG-SAM-17/30 (for T. antarctica) submitted to the CCAMLR Working Group on Ecosystem Monitoring and Management (EMM) and the CCAMLR Working Group on Statistics, Assessments and Modelling (SAM), respectively (available at https://www.ccamlr.org/en/wg-emm-16 and https://www.ccamlr.org/en/wg-s



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Helmholtz Cross Cutting Activity (2021-2027)
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Published
Eprint ID
56947
DOI 10.1594/PANGAEA.899520

Cite as
Pehlke, H. , Brey, T. and Teschke, K. (2019): Spatial distribution of a flying seabird (Antarctic petrel) and penguins (Ad\'elie penguin, Emperor penguin) in the wider Weddell Sea (Antarctica) with links to ArcGIS map package , [Other] doi: 10.1594/PANGAEA.899520


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