Weddell Sea is a globally significant contributor to deep-sea sequestration of natural carbon dioxide


Contact
mhoppema [ at ] awi-bremerhaven.de

Abstract

A mechanism of lateral transport of remineralized carbon from the subsurface Weddell Sea into the abyssal world oceans is presented and its impact is quantified. In the Weddell Sea interior, full remineralization of the export production occurs at shallow depths. This shallow, CO2-charged water stands in isopycnal contact with the abyssal world ocean waters to the north of the subpolar Weddell Sea. Via isopycnal water transport, remineralized CO2 is transferred and sequestered in the deep sea. The amount involved is 1.9 1013 g C yr-1, which is equal to at least 6% of the presently estimated world-wide natural CO2 sequestration in the abyssal oceans. It thus constitutes an important component of the lower limb of the global oceanic carbon cycle. There may be more regions like the Weddell Sea, where this mechanism could be active. It is likely to play a significant role on the glacial-interglacial time scale. During a glacial period, reduced CO2 transport via the CIW would tend to increase the atmospheric partial pressure of CO2 as opposed to the generally decreasing pCO2 trend.



Item Type
Article
Authors
Divisions
Programs
Peer revision
ISI/Scopus peer-reviewed
Publication Status
Published
Eprint ID
8954
DOI 10.1016/j.dsr.2004.02.011

Cite as
Hoppema, M. (2004): Weddell Sea is a globally significant contributor to deep-sea sequestration of natural carbon dioxide , Deep-sea research i, 51 , pp. 1169-1177 . doi: 10.1016/j.dsr.2004.02.011


Share


Citation

Research Platforms

Campaigns


Actions
Edit Item Edit Item